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Don’t Let Mouth Sores Bother You: A Comprehensive Guide

Posts Tagged ‘ canker sores ’



Don’t Let Mouth Sores Bother You: A Comprehensive Guide

Posted on: December 13th, 2023 by admin

Mouth sores are common and can be bothersome and painful. They can affect anyone, from children to older people. But, what exactly are they, and what causes them? What should you do if you develop one, and how can you prevent them from happening in the future? Let’s take a closer look at the various types of mouth sores, their symptoms, causes, treatments, and prevention methods.

There are several types of mouth sores, but the most common ones include canker sores, cold sores, and fever blisters. Canker sores are small, white or yellowish, round or oval-shaped sores that occur inside the mouth, while cold sores and fever blisters are groups of tiny, fluid-filled blisters that typically appear on or around the lips, chin, or cheeks. They are caused by different things, though.

Canker sores are often linked to stress, injury to the mouth, certain foods like spicy or acidic foods, and even hormonal changes. On the other hand, cold sores and fever blisters are caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and are highly contagious. They can spread through kissing, sharing utensils, or coming in contact with the fluid in the blisters.

The good news is that most mouth sores go away on their own within a couple of weeks, but there are ways to alleviate the pain and speed up the healing process. For instance, using over-the-counter pain relievers, applying numbing gels, gargling with saltwater, and avoiding spicy or acidic foods can help. For cold sores and fever blisters, antiviral medication is recommended.

Prevention is key when it comes to mouth sores. There are several things you can do to reduce your risk of developing them in the first place. This includes avoiding hot, spicy, or acidic foods, brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, replacing your toothbrush every three to four months, wearing a mouthguard if you play sports, and avoiding triggers that may lead to stress or anxiety.

Another important element of preventive care is maintaining good oral hygiene. This includes brushing your teeth twice a day, flossing daily, and visiting your dentist regularly. Your dentist can also diagnose and treat any underlying oral health problems that may contribute to the development of mouth sores. This can include gum disease, tooth decay, or oral infections.

Mouth sores can be painful and uncomfortable, but they are usually not serious and can be treated or prevented with the right care. Knowing the different types of mouth sores, their causes, symptoms, treatments, and prevention methods can help you stay one step ahead and avoid unnecessary pain or discomfort. If you notice any unusual changes in your mouth, or if your mouth sore persists for more than two weeks, it’s important to see your local dentist for proper diagnosis and treatment.